The Shark Research Institute

The Shark Research Institute is a non-profit organisation that has extended its work and research all over the world. This organisation was established in 1991 with the main objective of sponsoring and conducting in-depth research into the hundreds of different shark species. While its beginnings were in New Jersey, USA, there are now representative offices in South Africa, the Seychelles, Taiwan, Honduras, the Galapagos Islands, Mexico, Canada and Australia.

Apart from supporting other research initiatives, the Shark Research Institute is committed to raising awareness amongst members of the public as well as amongst fishermen, commercial divers and recreational divers. As knowledge and understanding increases, particularly in developing countries, so do the tolerance level and the desire to preserve the shark species in existence today.

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In addition, the Shark Research Institute is also instrumental in the founding of marine sanctuaries for sharks, recording and reporting on shark attacks on people around the world, providing a forum for related investigations, studying the behaviour of sharks, supporting shark attack victims through their recovery and maintaining a relevant library of succinct information. Information and education are vital to the preservation of the world's marine environments, and the Shark Research Institute undertakes many initiatives to visit corporate and educational facilities and tell people the truth about these long-dreaded fish. Publications are produced, lectures and conferences are conducted and financial aid is granted, all in a common concerted effort to preserve the precious shark species of the world.

By clearing up misconceptions about sharks, the Shark Research Institute hopes to redeem them of this dangerous reputation for which they have become notorious and preserve the lives of some of the 100 million sharks that are killed every year. Educating fisherman about the value of sharks will encourage responsible breeding and nurturing, rather than mass slaughter, which only benefits them on a very immediate basis.

Organisations like the Shark Research Institute are major role players in the preservation of the hundreds of shark species in the world's oceans today, many of which are currently endangered. The fact that they have extended themselves to other countries increases their likelihood of success and prompts global support on a mass scale.

For more information, please view: http://www.sharks.org/

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